home security tips

It seems that Nest Protect actually implemented such a system and, using an omnidirectional microphone, it will speak to you in words besides also using the appropriate colours: there are two types of alerts, the Heads up it’s a calmly spoken warning + yellow LED, when smoke or CO levels are rising but have not yet reached dangerous levels and the Emergency Alerts when smoke or CO are at dangerous levels, the Nest Protect notifies you where is the problem, it turns the LED red and triggers the loud sound alarm – 85dB. Head Up and Emergency alerts can be silenced by pressing the circular button. Note: This device is not intended for people with hearing problems it lacks a flashing strobe of light and the 85db alarm may not be enough in such cases. The Nest Protect runs self tests regularly every 200 seconds to see the status of the batteries and sensors and you can also run a full test to check at any time during this process, you’ll notice a blue light rotating around the button. If you have more than one Nest Protect detectors, you can interconnect them wirelessly the device supports the 802. 11b/g/n standard and Bluetooth Low Energy technology and, in case of an emergency, all the devices will speak at once telling you the location of the triggered alarm the devices shouldn’t be more than 50 feet apart from each other. The wired and battery models can be connected wirelessly up to 18 and you can also connect the Nest Protect with other Nest smart products such as the Nest Learning thermostat. Now, let’s talk about the elephant in the room or the Nest!: the security and privacy of your data. As you know, Nest is owned by Google, so this already makes people more cautious about their privacy. There has been a reported backdoor more than a couple of years ago on the Nest thermostat, but the Nest Protect was and remains unaffected by the IoT vulnerabilities and there are many. Now, Nest admits on collecting data from your system to analyse the average battery life, it records data about any adjustments you make to the product and the history of all changes, but it insists that all collected data is not sold to third party companies and the info may be shared but not before the user gives explicit permission to do so.

alert monitoring

01.14.2007 | 34 Comments

The use of smoke detecting devices in industrial sectors such as oil and gas, manufacturing, plants, and powerhouses will further boost the growth of these devices in the industrial sector. The residential end user segment is likely to witness rapid and considerable growth in CAGRs during the forecast period due to the rise in home automation and the implementation of stringent fire safety regulations. The global smart smoke detector market by power sources is divided into hardwired, battery powered, and hardwired with battery. In terms of revenue, the hardwired segment is likely to dominate the global market during the forecast period. The implementation of stringent safety regulations is a primary driver for hardwired devices. Easy installation and long battery life are the factors attributed to the increased demand for battery powered detectors.

medical alert services

01.14.2007 | 16 Comments

In London, a Metropolitan Police report showed that in 2008 only one crime was solved per 1000 cameras. In some cases CCTV cameras have become a target of attacks themselves. In the United States, Britain, Australia and New Zealand, CCTV is widely used in schools due to its success in preventing bullying, vandalism, monitoring visitors and maintaining a record of evidence in the event of a crime. There are some restrictions on installation, with cameras not being installed in an area where there is a "reasonable expectation of privacy", such as bathrooms, gym locker areas and private offices unless consent by the office occupant is given. Cameras are generally acceptable in hallways, parking lots, front offices where students, employees, and parents come and go, gymnasiums, cafeterias, supply rooms and classrooms. The installation of cameras in classrooms may be objected to by some teachers. There were an estimated 30 million surveillance cameras in the United States in 2011. Video surveillance has been common in the United States since the 1990s; for example, one manufacturer reported net earnings of $120 million in 1995. With lower cost and easier installation, sales of home security cameras increased in the early 21st century. Following the September 11 attacks, the use of video surveillance in public places became more common to deter future terrorist attacks. Under the Homeland Security Grant Program, government grants are available for cities to install surveillance camera networks.