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The Eastern countries have been doing this for years now and now it is the turn of the Western countries. On a cultural level, Eastern countries may be more ready and prepared to accept this growing trend and European countries may not be too far behind but for the British it may take a bit of a learning curve for all stakeholders to get used to. In the case of North Americans, only time will tell. Whatever the outcome, this trend probably has the potential to live for at least the next decade and it would be interesting to see how the marketing and advertising industries deal with this. I am going to leave you with a fascinating reference to check out. One that paints the picture for the reader in Britain.

security systems nashville

01.14.2007 | 34 Comments

Icontacted the company after an intruder vandalized my mother’s home. She had passedaway and the home was vacant, newly listed on the market. The intrudersreturned the following evening and attempted to make entry again. So when Icalled ADT on a Thursday I expressed that in order to sign the contract I wouldneed assurance that installation could be done within a few days. The originalCustomer Care Manager promised me it would be done the next day. It wasn’t untilafter three hours on the phone all day Friday that another Manager scheduledinstallation for Sat. In the late evening before the apt. I received avoicemail that the branch manager had cancelled the appointment. The thirdappointment was scheduled for the following Tues. I explained how I wasreluctant to schedule a third time since it was a four hour commute time and Ihad to reschedule several meetings. That Monday, with no explanation, thebranch manager again cancelled the install.

security alarm for homes

01.14.2007 | 16 Comments

Proponents of CCTV cameras argue that cameras are effective at deterring and solving crime, and that appropriate regulation and legal restrictions on surveillance of public spaces can provide sufficient protections so that an individual's right to privacy can reasonably be weighed against the benefits of surveillance. However, anti surveillance activists have held that there is a right to privacy in public areas. Furthermore, while it is true that there may be scenarios wherein a person's right to public privacy can be both reasonably and justifiably compromised, some scholars have argued that such situations are so rare as to not sufficiently warrant the frequent compromising of public privacy rights that occurs in regions with widespread CCTV surveillance. For example, in her book Setting the Watch: Privacy and the Ethics of CCTV Surveillance, Beatrice von Silva Tarouca Larsen argues that CCTV surveillance is ethically permissible only in "certain restrictively defined situations", such as when a specific location has a "comprehensively documented and significant criminal threat". A 2007 report by the UK Information Commissioner's Office, highlighted the need for the public to be made more aware of the growing use of surveillance and the potential impact on civil liberties. In the same year, a campaign group claimed the majority of CCTV cameras in the UK are operated illegally or are in breach of privacy guidelines. In response, the Information Commissioner's Office rebutted the claim and added that any reported abuses of the Data Protection Act are swiftly investigated. Even if there are some concerns arising from the use of CCTV such as involving privacy, more commercial establishments are still installing CCTV systems in the UK. In 2012, the UK government enacted the Protection of Freedoms Act which includes several provisions related to controlling and restricting the collection, storage, retention, and use of information about individuals. Under this Act, the Home Office published a code of practice in 2013 for the use of surveillance cameras by government and local authorities. The aim of the code is to help ensure their use is "characterised as surveillance by consent, and such consent on the part of the community must be informed consent and not assumed by a system operator.